The TENOR Network serves to help publicize and support the research activities of its members and the larger TENOR community.

Find here a list of upcoming TENOR-related events.

 

Upcoming Events

  • October 18, 2019
    Scores and Instruments Distributed on Mobile Devices

    A special session part of CMMR 2019 in Marseille
    Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research Conference

    The CMMR conference was initially focused on Music Information Retrieval. Since its launching in 2003, it has toured Europe, with one edition in India, and gradually enlarged its focus towards a more interdisciplinary approach to Computer Music. CMMR 2019 will be an homage to Jean-Claude Risset, who led the LMA-CNRS in Marseille for many years. The theme for CMMR 2019 will be: Perception, Representation, Image, Sound, Music (PRISM).
    This event will constitute the launching of the laboratory of the same name, and will therefore come to international attention.
    The special session “Scores and Instruments Distributed on Mobile Devices”, as part of the international conference, will include:

    • Peer reviewed papers
    • A round table discussion
    • Demos
    • A concert

    After the post-conference proceedings, some of the selected peer-reviewed papers will be published by Springer Verlag in the Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences Series (see http://kronland.fr/cmmr/).

    The use of mobile devices for musical performances will be presented using two different approaches: instrumental (demos) and notational (concert):

    • Demos focusing on “the smartphone as an instrument”
    • A concert focusing on “smartphones and tablet as networked music stands”

    In addition to the presentation of accepted submissions from the “call for performance”, demos will include workshops from CoSiMa, and SmartFaust, two different French research projects proposing to turn smartphones into multi-sensor samplers/synthesizers.
    The demos will be preceded by a round table, exploring three aspects of this approach: technical (native vs. web-based), sociological (participative concerts…), and aesthetic (why/how smartphones differ from acoustic instruments). The round table will include discussions about Bernard Cavanna’s Geek-Bagatelle (2016), for orchestra and “choir of
    smartphones”, and Georg Hajdu’s 144-part new work with live-distributed notation via MaxScore/Node.js.

    The evening concert will include the following:

    • Stockhausen’s Kontakte4 (Links ensemble), implemented in the
      Decibel ScorePlayer, with live projection of the score
    • Jonathan Bell’s Le temps des Nuages (Links + De Caelis)
    • Cat Hope’s Black Disciples (2013, transcription for high voices)
    • Lindsey Vickery Mezareon (2015, transcription for Links and De Caelis)
    • Sandeep Bhagwati Villanelles de Voyelles (2017)

     

    Full information here.

Past Events

  • July 31, 2019
    21st International Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCII2019) – Orlando, Florida

    HCII2019 is a large conference with several days of tutorials, parallel paper presentations, demonstrations, as well as industry exhibitions. In a parallel session entitled ‘Tactile displays: Issues and user experience’, McGill University student Travis West will present a summary of the research related to the body:suit:score, a vibrotactile musical notation display system which has been developed at matralab over the past four years. The associated research paper will be published in the conference proceedings. The presentation and publication will expose this TENOR-related
    research to an HCI focused audience and will allow West to gain a new perspective on matralab’s work with vibrotactile notations.

  • July 27, 2019
    TENOR 2019 Conference – Monash University

    This five-day conference, in partnership with the Australasian Computer Music Conference, is dedicated to issues in theoretical and applied research and development in music notation and representation, with a particular focus on computer tools and applications, as well as a connection to music creation. ‘Technology’ in the conference title refers to any means that may contribute to the notation, representation and/or visualisation of music and sound, for purposes that may include (but not limited to) music composition, performance, representation, transcription, analysis and pedagogy.
    The fifth TENOR conference will continue to offer a lively forum for current research into technologies for notation, representation and/or visualisation of the music and sound, for purposes that may include music composition, performance, representation, transcription, analysis and pedagogy. We also intend to expand the scope of the conference by calling for papers with a focus on how notation enables performance and the performer’s
    relationship to the score. The conference will feature leading Australian ensembles with an international reputation: including ELISION, Speak Percussion, Decibel, Clocked Out and the Monash student/staff laptop ensemble, MEME. Workshops will be featured, including a Performance Lab for independent musicians wishing to expand their capability with new types of notations. Students are encouraged to apply, and are peppered throughout the sessions, rather than a separate stream. The wonderful facilities at Monash, including a new Meyer Constellation system and cabaret style jazz club will form part of the landscape for events, in addition to the facilities at the school. First nations people can attend for free.

    Please consult the Conference website for all information!

  • July 26, 2019
    MIMIC Artist Summer Workshop

    http://www.emutelab.org/blog/summerworkshop

    MIMIC is a research project that implements machine learning and machine listening in a live coding environment for creative coders. We have recently released our tools on mimicproject.com and are in the process of finalising our system for creating live coding languages for creative AI.

    For this summer workshop in sunny Brighton, we invite artists who are interested in using machine learning and machine listening in their live performances and composition to build their own live coding languages with our new Sema system. 

  • March 16, 2019
    Interactive Traces – University of Liverpool

    Interactive Traces involves realizations of interactive screen-based scores, including animated scores, game-based scores and other audiovisual interactions. The featured ensemble will be the Ligeti String Quartet. Immediately following the concert there will be a discussion and Q & A session amongst the audience, performers and composers.

    Click here for more information

    This event is part of the Open Circuit Festival at the University of Liverpool.

  • February 26, 2019
    Ephemerides @ Montréal Nouvelles Musiques Festival 2019

    An immersive and unconventional experience: in this presentation the audience and six musicians walk through a space full of music and light. Communicating with each other through different types of interactive scores, musicians explore their own musical trajectories in a constantly changing sound environment. In this universe co-created by artificial intelligence score software, viewer will follow their own, unpredictable path through the constellations of light
    and sound of this captivating spectacle.

    This project will disseminate and highlight the use of several types of technological scores, whose development was discussed in Sandeep Bhagwati’s papers at recent Tenor conferences (2016, 2017, 2018). These scores – the body:suit:score, the elaborate audio score, and the interactive light score – will be demonstrated and used for the first time together in the same setting. The festival is the most visible venue for such presentation in Canada and the largest
    festival of its kind in North America.

    Full information here.

  • November 30, 2018
    ossia networking workshops / lectures – matralab Concordia University

    ossia is an initiative to create open-source scoring software for Interactive/Intermedia Arts, focused particularly on intermedia composition and interoperability between different elements of a intermedia installation or performance.
    It is based on more than a decade of MusicTech / ComputerScience research around the i-score and Jamoma projects. It re-implements the specifications of the prototypes that came out of those research projects into a more advanced and consolidated state.
    ossia hence provides a toolkit for designing flexible time-scripting and complex mappings between multimedia/intermedia applications. As such, ossia (much like its predecessor Jamoma) is used by a growing number of composers, artists and creative organizations worldwide for compositions, live performances, interactive installations and touring exhibitions.
    Among those users, artists/researchers from matralab, Topological Media Lab and Metacreation Lab have been using Jamoma for the last decade, but this framework is not supported anymore, and they are in desperate need of a new environment in which they can work with their creative tools in a sustainable way. Over the last year, many of them have been considering a migration to ossia.

    However, libossia and ossia score, though being extremely promising software tools, require some substantial work to be extended, finalized, stabilized and documented in order to be disseminated to the wider artistic community. Hence the ossia team, led by Pascal Baltazar (Quercy, France) and Philippe Pasquier (Vancouver), are currently preparing applications to two different R&D tracks and funding opportunities.

    For more information click here

  • May 26, 2018
    TENOR 2018 Fourth International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation

    The first three TENOR conferences (2015 Paris, 2016 Cambridge, 2017 A Coruña) have established the growing relevance of emergent technologies of notation and representation for a wide range of musical practices: composers, performers, theoreticians, performance researchers, historians, ethnomusicologists, archivists etc.

    The term “Technologies of Notation and Representation” encompasses the two principal modes of approaching performing arts by way of another medium: in order to either provide performers with a set of references or instructions that guide their performance (notation); or in order to de-ephemeralize (mostly: visualize) performance praxis for offline analysis or archiving (representation).

    The Fourth International Conference onTechnologies for Music Notation and Representation conference will be three-days long, one day at each university. In keeping with methodologies of research-creation, we will issue a call for scores alongside the call for papers. Works selected will be presented in workshop concerts / readings by well-known local ensembles such as Ensemble Supermusique, Quatuor Bozzini, and CLOrk (Concordia Laptop Orchestra). We will also offer, in parallel, a 5 day Performers’ Lab, for performers from all traditions interested in expanding their practice by performing scores that use new notational technologies.

    Full conference proceedings here.

  • May 26, 2017
    TENOR 2017 Third International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation

    The third International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation is dedicated to issues in theoretical and applied research and development in Music Notation and Representation, with a strong focus on computer tools and applications, as well as a tight connection to music creation. Until very recently, the support provided by the computer music to the field of symbolic notation remained fairly conventional. However, recent developments indicate that the field of tools for musical notation is now moving towards new forms of representation. Moreover, musical notation, transcription, sonic visualisation, and musical representation are often associated in the fields of musical analysis, ethnology, and acoustics. The aim of this conference is to explore all of recent mutations of notation and representation in all domains of music.

    Full conference proceedings here.

  • May 29, 2016
    TENOR 2016 Second International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation

    The second International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation was dedicated to issues in theoretical and applied research and development in Music Notation and Representation, with a focus on computer tools and applications, music creation and cognition.

    Until very recently, the support provided by computer music developers and practitioners to the field of symbolic notation has remained fairly conventional. However, recent developments indicate that the field of tools for musical notation is now moving towards new forms of representation. Moreover, musical notation, transcription, sonic visualisation, and musical representation are often associated with the fields of musical analysis, ethnology, and acoustics. The aim of this conference is to explore all recent mutations of notation and representation in all domains of music.

    This year we extended the call to include cognition as well as ontological issues of performance practice arising from the use of traditional and/or graphical notation systems in live electronics.

    Full conference proceedings here.

  • May 30, 2015
    TENOR 2015 First International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation

    The first International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation was dedicated to issues in theoretical and applied research and development in Music Notation and Representation, with a strong focus on computer tools and applications, as well as a tight connection to music creation.
    Until very recently, the support provided by the computer music to the field of symbolic notation remained fairly conventional. However, recent developments indicate that the field of tools for musical notation is now moving towards new forms of representation. Moreover, musical notation, transcription, sonic visualization, and musical representation are often associated in the fields of musical analysis, ethnology, and acoustics. The aim of this conference is to explore all of recent mutations of notation and representation in all domains of music.

    Full Conference Proceedings